© 2015 by Salmon Watersheds Lab

Kara Pitman

Investigating interconnectivity of Pacific salmon, climate and vegetation.

 

I am broadly interested in the interconnectivity of Pacific salmon, climate and vegetation. I want to understand how Pacific salmon populations respond to large-scale climatic patterns and hydrological cycles operating at a watershed scale. I plan to identify relationships between historic stream flow variability and Pacific salmon abundance in rain-dominated, snow-dominated and glacial-dominated basins. Elucidating these patterns is important to understanding how past climate fluctuations influence Pacific salmon abundance and habitat, and to project how Pacific salmon may respond to future climate changes in sensitive aquatic ecosystems.

 

I will be conducting my fieldwork in the Skeena Watershed, northwest British Columbia. Previously to arriving at SFU, I worked with BC Ministry Staff, Bulkley Valley Research Centre, and First Nation communities on various projects based in the Skeena Watershed. These involved modeling historical peak and low hydrological flow patterns and conducting surveys of anglers to assess opinions on angling conditions in the Skeena Watershed.

Kara's Website